For my Journalism class I have to read a work of non-fiction and create my own project regarding the topic. I'm reading the book Where the Girls Are by Susan J. Douglas. The author was part of the baby boom and the book gives her perspective of growing up as a female with the mass media around every corner. I'm going to use this blog to help record my thoughts as I read. I'll post anything that has to do with the topic, photos, info, music, even my own experiences dealing with feminism and being a women. 307 pages. Let's find out where the girls are and where this little project will take us. Want to read the book too? http://www.amazon.com/Where-Girls-Are-Growing-Female/dp/0812925300 Website Hit Counters

girlsgetbusyzine:

A little preview of the Girls Get Busy Feminist Zine Distro that I’m currently building!

Oct 24th at 1AM / via: jane-sadwoman / op: girlsgetbusyzine / reblog / 297 notes
Even in a dress, Nancy Drew isn’t afraid of the dark, a few spider webs or even a bad guy. When I was busy burying my face in the entire Nancy Drew series from the ages of 8 to 10, I didn’t realize at the time what a huge impact they would make on me. Instead of being obsessed with the latest Disney princess movie I was learning that a girl could be smart, fearless and successful, all on her own.
Check out this article by ABC News that discusses Nancy Drew’s importance.
http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/story?id=8034954&page=1#.UH9_-qPfKSo

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Even in a dress, Nancy Drew isn’t afraid of the dark, a few spider webs or even a bad guy. When I was busy burying my face in the entire Nancy Drew series from the ages of 8 to 10, I didn’t realize at the time what a huge impact they would make on me. Instead of being obsessed with the latest Disney princess movie I was learning that a girl could be smart, fearless and successful, all on her own.

Check out this article by ABC News that discusses Nancy Drew’s importance.

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/story?id=8034954&page=1#.UH9_-qPfKSo

Just from the picture it is clear that the female characters are much stronger and confident than the male characters.
Kim Possible’s motto was “I can do anything.” She was the fight against the typical female protagonist, fighting crime, getting straight A’s and being captain of the cheer squad.
Shego, Kim’s rival, was also a strong female character who assisted many of the villains on the show. Well, they may have thought that she was assisting them, but she was actually doing all of the work.
Male characters like Ron, Dr. Drakken and many more were portrayed as smart but clumsy. In fact, they were the ones who often needed to be rescued, which switches up the cliche, damsel in distress plot in most stories.
Kim Possible, although just a Disney cartoon for kids, gave a generation of girls something they desperately needed, a strong female hero and role model to look up to.

Just from the picture it is clear that the female characters are much stronger and confident than the male characters.

Kim Possible’s motto was “I can do anything.” She was the fight against the typical female protagonist, fighting crime, getting straight A’s and being captain of the cheer squad.

Shego, Kim’s rival, was also a strong female character who assisted many of the villains on the show. Well, they may have thought that she was assisting them, but she was actually doing all of the work.

Male characters like Ron, Dr. Drakken and many more were portrayed as smart but clumsy. In fact, they were the ones who often needed to be rescued, which switches up the cliche, damsel in distress plot in most stories.

Kim Possible, although just a Disney cartoon for kids, gave a generation of girls something they desperately needed, a strong female hero and role model to look up to.

"Miss Independent" by Kelly Clarkson

“When I open Vogue, for example, I am simultaneously infuriated and seduce, grateful to escape temporarily into a narcissistic paradise where I’m the center of the universe, outraged that completely unattainable standards of wealth and beauty exclude me and most women I know form the promised land…that’s what it means to be a woman in America.”

Where the Girls Are by Susan J. Douglas

About

I thought I’d tell a little about who I am and why exactly I’m interested in reading this book and feminism. I’m a 17 year old girl, 5 more months until I’m 18. I’m half Mexican and half Irish, although I don’t really look like either. I’ve lived in the Chicago suburbs my whole life and have a younger sister and brother. Middle class, pretty average and full of teen angst. I dye my hair random colors and listen to music that I think is awesome.I have always been very shy but very independent. I’m pretty soft spoken and awkward but when it comes down to it, I don’t take shit from people.

I think the first signs of my feminist views began showing when I was in second grade. I thought the girls who played tag with the boys were stupid and my favorite cartoon was Kim Possible. If you’re not familiar with the show, it was about a high school girl who fought bad guys with her doofy guy friend, Ron. The show had all strong female roles in it. Later on I had read every Nancy Drew book ever written and worshiped Kelly Clarkson at the age of 11. The song “Miss Independent” and her whole image was something I admired and aspired to be.

As a seventh grader, I began buying Cosmogirl and misguidedly believed that I would one day become the editor of the magazine. Fortunately, at the same time I was discovering pop punk and concerts. I barely avoided the vapid teenage girl world by absorbing myself into lyrics that dealt with love and life (however whiny they were). Although that music scene may be just as known for being concerned with looks, I wasn’t being pressured into they “typical” girl look like most of my friends were. I learned to not just be different but to love being different.

In high school, I thankfully never fell victim to low self-esteem and self-hatred of my body. I was still shy but I had a hidden confidence and began to make friends with people I never thought I would have. 2 years ago, I was asked to play the bass in my friends band. After all the practices and playing those first fewvery smallshows with my friends, I fell in love with the idea of being a girl in a band. Music, especially rock, has been predominantly men. Even with bands like the Runaways, No Doubt or Paramore, it is still rare to see a girl being taken seriously on stage.

I’m finishing up my senior year and I’m currently working on getting an ALL girl band together but finding a girl drummer is proving a little difficult. I do have a boyfriend, but he respects and supports my ideals and doesn’t ever pull a sandwich joke. I still love the color pink, like to dress nice, wear make-up and shamelessly watch episodes of One Tree Hill. Even though I know how stupid most of the portrayals of the characters are.

I love being a girl, I am PROUD of it. With all the “girly” things I do, I hope that with our society now that gender roles with continue to blur, even in my mind. The stereotypes that have been produced by the media and the thoughts that have been forced fed us have created a pressure that I hope one day girls don’t have to deal with as much.

Just a little bio, including past, present, future.

“I’m not supposed to admit I’m a feminist, and neither are you, for this portion of our history evokes as much derision as what preceded it…It’s best to say, “I’m not a feminist, but…” before putting forward a feminist postion.”

Where the Girls Areby Susan J. Douglas

Introductions

I have only gotten about 20 pages into the book (barely making a dent) and I’ve already underlined way too much. I have also had to resist the urge to jump out of my chair in excitement/rage one too many times. I know I’m going to agree with practically everything Susan J. Douglas says and it makes me want to shove the book into every face of every girl I know. I have always thought many of the things she is mentioning so far but she articulates them in such a better way. AND this was only the introduction of the book.